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Selecting a Teacher

Selecting a Teacher

When you start looking for college to attend, make a list of all of your options. Figure out if you are applying to schools just within your state or throughout the whole country/world and make a list of your options. Find the horn teacher’s profile on each school’s website and you should be able to get a sense of what kind of teacher and performer the teacher is. If possible, travel to each teacher and have a lesson when you are trying to choose where you are applying. At the least, have some email correspondence with the teacher so that a dialogue has been started and they know you are interested.
Through lessons and communications, you can get the sense of whether you and the teacher would work well together. It is always ok if you do not feel like you would like to study with a particular teacher, just as it is ok that a teacher may not want to take you on as a student. It is all about finding the right fit. My suggestions are finding out what their strongest teaching skills are and make sure that they align with your deficiencies. Also, take a look at their bios and see if the things they have done align with what you would like to do.

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Other Blogs and Websites

Other Blogs and Websites
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www.jamesboldin.com - James Boldin’s Horn World James’ site is an all around resources for the horn world. He has a blog that is frequently updated and personal information about his life as a teacher and performer. He also has a job listings page that has a current list of professional ensemble auditions and teaching jobs that are open.
www.hornmatters.com - Horn Matters, by John Ericson and Bruce Hembd This blog is a HUGE resource for horn players. These guys have arranged their blog by topic and they create new posts all the time. This blog is one of the most user friendly music blogs that I have encountered.

Overtone Series

Overtone Series
All instruments are created around a naturally occuring series of notes. Each fingering on every instrument allows a certain series of notes to be produced and that series is called the overtone series. With the correct setup and everything working in the right way, the attempted note should come out. However, there are various issues that can cause incorrect notes to come out. Have you ever heard a reed instrument squeak? That is a note within their overtone series that came out instead of the note they were attempting. On the horn, the overtone series on the open F side of the horn looks like this: (photo credit : Maurice Limon)
This series works for each fingering on the F side of the horn and goes down by half-step as you add fingerings in order (2, 1, 12, 23, 13, 123) and this is how the fingerings for all of the notes on the horn are determined.
There are many exercises that are based around the knowledge of the overtone series. Some of the notes are not perfectly i…